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DIY Personalised Embroidery T-Shirt



You may have noticed by now that I like to DIY my own versions of existing designs. While I understand why pricing is the way it is in the retail industry, I also feel as though this fast-fashion culture we've come accustomed to leads to a higher level of waste. Today's DIY is inspired by Maison Labiche's embroidered t-shirt which would set you back £60. The idea behind it is to wear something you love, close to your heart.



Step 1: Decide on your desired personalisation and prepare a couple font sketches on graph or lined paper with a pencil. I'm a huge fan of Audrey Hepburn, I love her style and her incredible humanitarianism. So, I have chosen to embroider her name onto the t-shirt. 


Step 2 (optional) : Outline your desired font in a black marker pen.


Step 3: If you're confident enough, very lightly sketch onto your t-shirt your desired motif with a Biro or an invisible pen. I put the paper underneath the t-shirt and used a DIY light box I had already made, to shine a light through and traced the motif on top. A great dupe for the Maison Labiche t-shirts are the 'Boyfriend Tees' by Primark and only cost £3.50.


Step 4 (optional): Tighten an embroidery hoop around the lightly sketched motif making sure the fabric is taught but not stretched.


Step 5: Thread a needle and start sewing short back stitches. Back stitching requires you to go back on the previous stitch to finish it. Finish each thread by triple-knotting the ends. Be sure to sew loosely to allow for stretch.


Done!


This is a fantastic way to spruce up old t-shirts that would've otherwise been thrown into a rubbish tip. Not only are you saving the planet from environmental damage, but you're developing new or existing skills and creating brand new garments to add to your collection. These would make great gifts and are easy to duplicate. I plan on making a couple more in different colourways. Check out Oxfam's online shop for some plain t-shirts to customise and make your own.



19 comments:

  1. I love this idea, Being a fashion student I love DIY Fashion I will definitely give this a go!

    xoxoxoxoxoxo
    http://rosebellxo.blogspot.co.uk/

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    1. If you do do this DIY, email me with a link to your piece! :)

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  2. Another one of your DIYs I love! Saw you post a pic of you doing this on Twitter and it's turned out great! I much prefer Audrey Hepburn than any of the names on the Maison Labiche pile.

    Jade | JadeFungBlog

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    1. I'm glad you like it Jade! I do like the Maison Labiche t-shirts but none of them were relevant to me.

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  3. Hey, I love your blog great work ;) Please come check mine out, if you decide to follow me, leave me a comment and I’ll follow you back :) XxXx
    http://lifewithalipglosssmile.blogspot.co.uk/

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  4. Super cute! I think this is a lovely idea DIY, I might not make mine exactly as you have or the Maison Labiche t-shirts but it's great inspiration.
    <3 Carolyn

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    1. If you make your own version, share it here! I'd love to see your own take on it!

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  5. Last time you've wrote an article against counterfeit products and now you've actually counterfeited one.. respect!?

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    1. I thought twice about approving this comment but thought I would do just to explain :)

      If you re-read the article, you'll understand that this is a designer-influenced piece. In no way am I passing it off as Maison Labiche. Considering that designers are the pioneers of fashion and trends, they expect a level of replication (see how high street brands create exact duplicates of runway pieces without passing it off as designer). If this t-shirt was recreated by Topshop or Forever21, people would instantly assume it was paying homage to that designer and would note that it is designer-influenced. However, I feel that because I had previously written an article on counterfeiting and because I am just one individual who has recreated this garment, there appears to be some sort of double-standard.

      The retail industry relies heavily on designer influences to generate money that feeds into the economy, employment and new businesses. While it may seem superficial, it is vital to our economy - especially in its current state.

      As noted in my article, a large part of why counterfeiting is immoral is because of the working conditions of the underpaid and exploited workers - dare I say 'slaves'. I am not fuelling such activity in making this t-shirt as I have made it myself.

      Fashion provides a lot of beauty and self-confidence to some people and I feel that is really important. Something you wear on the outside has the power to make you feel good inside, and that I believe is healthy especially for women who often fight the battle of low self-confidence from things like everyday sexism and warped/brainwashing media. Often, retailers sell clothing at high prices that average Alice cannot afford what with her mortgage, bills, car, debt and single parenting. If Alice can't afford a £60 t-shirt and can recreate it at home for less so she could have more disposable income to spend on her children and so long as no-one is being hurt emotionally or physically, then I don't see how it would be wrong to do so.

      What truly matters is a person's happiness and safety and I don't feel that I am jeopardising anyone's happiness and safety through recreating this style of garment.

      Designer influenced high street fashion: http://www.redcarpet-fashionawards.com/category/blog-features/designer-vs-high-street/

      If you'd like to chat about this any more, I would be happy to. Just pop me an email! :)

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  6. Love this DIY. I have some extra embroidery thread lying around so I'll definitely be giving this a go! And I just had to mention that I loved your response to the comment regarding 'counterfeiting'. Some bloggers dismiss such comments or reply rudely but your comment explained your position and thoughts eloquently. Love your blog.

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    1. Thank you, Hyunsook. I'm glad you're going to replicate this DIY, I hope you're pleased with the outcome. Share some photos of your finished t-shirt if you can :) I'd love to add it onto this post. Thank you for your support, I cherish every comment and reader I gain!

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  7. Oh man who could possibly attack you for replicating a design that simple 'inspired' you -- Like you said store get inspro from all over and higher end designers all always duplicated! - I love this DIY and there is nothing wrong with sharing! Continue on lol!

    kouturekittenblog

    Bloglovin’

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    1. Thanks Kristina, I'm glad you feel the same!

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  8. I can't wait to try this!

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  9. Love this DIY!! What font did you use to create the outline?

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  10. Love this DIY!! What font did you use to create the outline?

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  11. great blog.you done a great work.your blog always useful and great.thanks for sharing it.

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  12. Mysewcuteboutique.com is perfect to provide the great and new designs in garments. We are serving embroidery fonts, applique designs, embroidery designs, embroidery designs, embroidery library, machine embroidery designs, free embroidery designs and free embroidery fonts.

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